Walk Through History at Enniskillen Castle: Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh

One of the six counties of Northern Ireland, Fermanagh is often referred to as ‘The Lakelands’ as nearly 1/3 of the county consists of Upper and Lower Lough Erne and its rivers. Situated between the lakes, at one of the only ancient entrances to Ulster, sits Ennsikillen Castle. From its 15th century position of strength […]

Continue Reading ...

Meeting the Puffins on Skellig Michael: Co Kerry

A trip to Skellig Michael sometimes includes a rough sea crossing, but a trip to the UNESCO World Heritage site proves to be one of the most unforgettable experiences in Ireland. The island rises sharply out of the ocean and visitors are able to climb over 600 feet above sea level along stone stairs that […]

Continue Reading ...

Ross Errilly Friary Ruins: Co Galway

Hidden among the inland fields of County Galway, Ross Errilly Friary presents a maze of historic buildings and chambers. The site is unusually in that it has two cloisters, and both are still intact. Wikipedia: Ross Errilly Friary Megalithic Ireland: Ross Errilly Friary Abandoned Ireland: Ross Errilly Friary Library Ireland: Abbey of Ross-Errilly

Continue Reading ...

Craggaunowen – Walk Through Ireland’s History: Kilmurry, Co Clare

Most tourist to Ireland will miss Craggaunowen, though many of the country’s most popular sites lie nearby. A perfect site to pair with the Cliffs of Moher, the Burren, Bunratty or King John’s Castle, a visit to Craggaunowen allows you to walk through Ireland’s history in a way that is both fun an educational. Built […]

Continue Reading ...

The Long and Winding Road to Gleninchaquin: Beara Peninsula, Co Kerry

Hidden in a scenic glacial valley less than 20 miles from Kenmare is Gleninchaquin Park. A small one-track road meanders deep into the Beara Peninsula. At one point an even smaller side road leads to Uragh Stone Circle. As you near the park the vista opens to dramatically display Inchaquin Falls cascading about 300 feet […]

Continue Reading ...

Uninterrupted Time at Rathgall Hillfort: Shillelagh, Co Wicklow

While not a place you would necessarily make a destination in itself, the Rathgall Hillfort in Wicklow (just west of Tullow, Carlow) is a lovely stop if you find yourself nearby. While excavations have taken place here, the site now sits on its peak awaiting any travelers who happen to search it out (or take […]

Continue Reading ...

The Medieval Treasures of Fethard: Co Tipperary

The village of Fethard is home to a surprising number of medieval ruins. The old walls still surround the village and a signposted walking route has been established. Visitors can stroll along a section of the tall walls from the grounds of Holy Trinity Church which was built by the Normans in the 1200s Inside […]

Continue Reading ...

The Lucky Ducks of St Stephen’s Green: Dublin

While St Stephen’s Green is popular with locals and visitors needing a break from the city, during the 1916 uprising, the park was a battle site. The grounds keeper of the day James Kearney wouldn’t let revolution endanger his rare breeds of ducks. He convinced both sides to stop fighting for one hour a day […]

Continue Reading ...

Oscar Wilde in the Park: Dublin

The jury’s out on whether Mr. Wilde would approve of the slightly bawdy statue commemorating him in Merrion Square. Perched on a rock in the park with a green carnation in his lapel (an historic clue to his homosexuality), the dapper writer’s gaze is split between the feminine figure of his pregnant wife on one […]

Continue Reading ...

Patrick Kavanagh on the Grand Canal, Dublin

Ireland is known for honoring her writers. When Patrick Kavanagh stated the best way to memorialize him was with a bench, Dublin gave him a permanent spot along the Grand Canal with a statue by John Coll. Wikipedia: Patrick Kavanagh Story Map: Kavanagh’s Parnassus Come Here to Me: Kavanagh’s two Dublin seats and an international […]

Continue Reading ...

Exclusive Updates